Most People Tell Lies Everyday

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A study conducted by University of Massachusetts psychologist Robert S. Feldman found that, during a 10-minute conversation, 60 percent of people lied at least once.

“People tell a considerable number of lies in everyday conversation. It was a very surprising result. We didn’t expect lying to be such a common part of daily life,” said Feldman.

Feldman also found that lies told by women and men are different in content, but not in quantity. “Women were more likely to lie to make the person they were talking to feel good, while men lied most often to make themselves look better,” said Feldman.

“It’s so easy to lie,” remarked Feldman. When we are children, we are taught that honesty is the best policy. But somewhere along the way this message gets twisted when, for example, we are told to be polite and pretend we like a gift we have been given. This mixed message about lying can’t help but have an impact on our behavior as adults.

For more information on this study, please visit UMass Amherst News & Media Relations.

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Sisters Make the World a Better Place

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If you grew up with at least one sister, you are generally a happier and more balanced adult than if you had grown up without a female sibling in the family. These are the findings of a London survey done in 2009 and presented to The British Psychological Society.

“Sisters appear to encourage more open communication and cohesion in families… Emotional expression is fundamental to good psychological health and having sisters promotes this in families,” says Professor Tony Cassidy of Ulster’s School of Psychology.

Cassidy, who conducted the study of 571 participants between the ages of 17 and 25, found that people who grew up without a sister tend to be more distressed.

So, if you have at least one sister, give her a hug! Odds are that she has provided you with better social support, more optimism, and better coping abilities than if you had grown up without her.

For more information on this study, please visit London’s University of Ulster.

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